IFP Opens Submissions for IFP Film Week

Spotlight on Documentaries is an extremely successful and viable forum for U.S. and International buyers, sales agents, and financiers to meet with filmmakers with new documentary feature and serialized projects. Presenting 60+ documentary projects ranging from those at an early financing stage (i.e. early development or in production) to those nearing completion (i.e. in post-production or at a rough cut stage), this section includes emerging and established filmmakers working in non-fiction.

Accepted filmmakers take part in pre-scheduled one-on-one meetings with potential financing and distribution partners, speed dating meetings with festival programmers, invitations to private documentary events, and exclusive access to the Filmmaker Conference. Applications are now open. (Early Deadline: May 2nd. Late Deadline: May 23rd). Apply here!

Sense and Sensuality: Bay Area Feminist Filmmaking of the 1980s // NYC

Ricky-and-Rocky-1-300x171Don’t miss the second installment of Eye on a Director, MAD highlights the collection of the legendary film distributor and archive Canyon Cinema. In the late 1950s, Canyon Cinema brought together independent film artists whose work reflected a remarkable diversity in style and content. Variously called avant-garde, underground and experimental, these artists shared a vision of filmmaking as a form of personal expression, free from the demands and constraints of commercial conventions.

Canyon Cinema began in Bay Area experimental filmmaker Bruce Baillie’s Canyon, California home. Initially an informal gathering for filmmakers to share their work with a 16mm projector and a bed sheet hung in the backyard, Canyon Cinema, Inc. was officially founded in 1967 by Bruce Baillie, Bruce Conner, Robert Nelson, Chick Strand and others as a collective-run distribution company dedicated to educating the public about independent artist-made moving images and providing access to its collection of more than 2500 works to universities and cultural organizations worldwide. In 2012, the group voted to become a nonprofit, and today it is one of the few remaining organizations providing access to works in one of the essential forms of twentieth century art: celluloid film. Canyon Cinema is home to a unique collection of Super 8mm, 16mm and 35mm film prints from 260 artists, a collection that represents the most comprehensive history of the experimental and avant-garde filmmaking movement from 1921 to today.

Working directly with MAD, Canyon’s staff and board of directors served as co-curators for this series, selecting films that reveal the history of an artistic community and its lineage today and focusing on experimental documentaries from Canyon Cinema’s archive that parallel American cinematic movements.

SENSE AND SENSUALITY: BAY AREA FEMINIST FILMMAKING OF THE 1980s
July 21, 2016, 7 pm
$10 general / $5 members and students
Theater at MAD

83 min, 16mm Projection
“Valley Fever” (Stephanie Beroes, 1979, 20 min)
“Maternal Filigree” (Sandra Davis, 1980, 18 min)
“Sincerely” (Lynn Marie Kirby, 1980, 14 min)
“Department of the Interior” (Nina Fonoroff, 1986, 9 min)
“Futility” (Greta Snider, 1989, 9 min)
“Chronicles of a Lying Spirit (by Kelly Gabron)” (Cauleen Smith, 1990, 13 min)

Much critical attention to women’s avant-garde filmmaking of the 1970s and ’80s focused on East Coast and European feminist filmmakers, the critique of visual pleasure, and the notion of the male gaze in cinema. In San Francisco, a new generation of feminist avant-garde filmmakers was emerging with a very different approach to questions of gender and pleasure in cinema. Influenced as much by the work of Gunvor Nelson and Chick Strand as by Laura Mulvey and Yvonne Rainer, these artists emphasized visual pleasure, finding in cinema sensual and lyrical ways to explore the personal and political experience of coming to consciousness as young radicals. Their focus on color, texture, montage, sounds, and text created a deeply sensuous and searching cinema. This largely unheralded body of work housed at Canyon has influenced subsequent feminist filmmaking on the West Coast and beyond.
More info: http://madmuseum.org/events/sense-and-sensuality-bay-area-feminist-filmmaking-1980s

SECESSION: THE DECAY OF PATRIARCHY
August 11, 2016, 7 pm
$10 general / $5 members and students
Theater at MAD

71 min, 16mm Projection
“Take Off” (Gunvor Nelson, 1972, 8 min)
“Lie Back and Enjoy It” (JoAnn Elam, 1982, 8 min)
“Mutiny” (Abigail Child, 1983, 11 min)
“The Colorof Love” (Peggy Ahwesh, 1994, 10 min)
“Menses” (Barbara Hammer, 1974, 4 min)
“Generations” (Gina Carducci & Barbara Hammer, 2011, 30 min)

Highlighting multiple generations of feminist filmmakers across the country, Canyon’s archive is an encompassing survey of radical cinema. With “Take Off,” Gunvor Nelson introduces the viewer to Burlesque legend Ellion Ness, using the camera and editing effects to make a statement about what it means to strip as a woman. JoAnn Elam’s “Lie Back and Enjoy It” is an eight-minute dialogue about rape culture and the representation of women living under patriarchy. It consists of optically printed images set to a structural conversation on the very film the viewer is watching. Abigail Child’s “Mutiny” interprets and interpolates the voices and music of a diverse cast of women. In “The Color of Love,” Peggy Ahwesh uses a variety of chemical reactions to alter and recompose images taken from a pornographic film. In “Menses,” Barbara Hammer elevates the imagery and politics of menstruation with high drama and wry wit. The program closes with “Generations,” a collaborative film by Hammer and Gina Carducci, who uses a Bolex camera to shoot the final days of Astroland amusement park in a downtrodden Coney Island at the turn of the century. Hammer and Carducci edited their own halves of the film and joined the two in the middle. More info: http://www.madmuseum.org/events/secession-decay-patriarchy

Here’s Why It’s So Important to Hire More Female Directors

kathryn-bigelow-ava-duvernayFilms directed by women are much more likely to employ women in other behind-the-scenes roles

Putting a woman in the director’s chair makes it much more likely that the film will also achieve gender parity in other behind-the-scenes roles, according to a new study that examines last year’s top-grossing films.

The study makes an ongoing federal probe in Hollywood’s hiring practices all the more urgent. Women made up just 13% of directors who released a film to theaters last year and not even one-tenth of the directors on the 250 top-grossing films.

“The findings suggest that women directors, executive producers and producers may serve and important gateway function in the employment of other women in key behind-the-scenes roles,” Martha Lauzen, who conducted the study of 700 films from last year and acts as director at the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University, said in a statement. (Eliana Dockterman @edockterman Oct. 27, 2015, Time Magazine) Read more:  http://time.com/4087813/female-directors-study/