Miranda July donates archive of “Joanie 4 Jackie” to the Getty Research Institute

The Getty Research Institute acquires feminist video chain letter collection created by Miranda July (American film director, screenwriter, actor, author, and artist) beginning in 1995 includes over 200 titles. The Joanie 4 Jackie (originally called Big Miss Moviola) is a large collection of short movies and video art distributed by filmmaker and artist Miranda July in the ‘90s and 2000s.

In 1995 Miranda July dropped out of college, moved to Portland, Oregon, and typed up a pamphlet that she imagined would be the start of a revolution of girls and women making movies. “Through Joanie 4 Jackie I learned how to conceive of myself as a filmmaker – how to create a sustaining community hidden inside a larger culture that didn’t even know we existed,” said July. “That has served me well in every facet of my life and it is my greatest hope that the archives will provide fodder for new ideas about networks, survival, and the use of technology.”

Check out http://www.joanie4jackie.com/

Sundance Producing Lab & Fellow – Apply

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CREATIVE PRODUCING INITIATIVE – Sundance Institute has long recognized the crucial role independent producers in finding, championing, and shaping original voices in filmmaking. The core of the Creative Producing Initiative are its labs that identify and nurture the independent producer. There are three different producing Labs throughout the year, depending on your area of focus: Documentary and Feature Film. More info:
http://www.sundance.org/initiatives/creative-producing

FREE Filmmaker Toolkit

WFI-WITH-SPACE1We’re working on creating the Fierce Filmmaker Toolkit that will be available on our site to download for FREE. We need your help. We want to create the Fiercest Filmmaker Toolkit ever and that will help filmmakers around the world to be more productive, from concept to distribution. We want to create a toolkit that is valuable, current and that can help emerging talent to established professionals in filmmaking be the best that they can be.

We’ve created a quick survey. There are only 5 questions that will take a couple of minutes to complete. Your feedback will give us more insight into what you would like to learn and what tools/advice/tips that you can recommend that increased your success as a filmmaker. We look forward to hearing from you. Take a minute to fill out the Fierce Filmmaker Toolkit Survey. We promise it will be worth your time!

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Penelope Spheeris Reveals the Backstory Behind Cult Documentary ‘The Decline of Western Civilizaton’

75For a movie about the underground punk scene, the film’s nearly impossible-to-find status contributed to its cult appeal. The director explains why it hasn’t been legally available until now.

For decades, there were only two ways to watch “The Decline of Western Civilization”: buy a bootleg or download it online. Both are illegal. For a movie about the underground punk scene, the film’s nearly impossible-to-find status contributed to its cult appeal. Like hunting down a rare vinyl record or an out-of-print fanzine, scoring a copy of the 1981 documentary required a rabid degree of dedication in exchange for street cred.

Penelope Spheeris, the film’s director, has a less romantic way of explaining the movie’s thriving underground market: theft. “You know that feeling you get in your stomach that’s like this fluttery kind of fear?” she told Indiewire recently, describing the sensation that would wash over her when she’d stumble across a bootleg copy of “The Decline of Western Civilization,” including the 1988 and 1998 sequels of the same name. “The worst part about it was that they were making really bad copies, that my work looked like shit. And that’s the part also that really upset me.”

After years of what she describes as paralyzing anxiety surrounding the films she considers her life’s most important work, Spheeris finally did something about that queasy feeling in her gut. At the insistence of her daughter, Anna Fox, who has stayed in touch with many of the subjects in her mother’s films, Spheeris undertook an intensive two-year process of digging up and editing archival footage, restoring the movies and shopping for a distributor. Beginning on June 30, all three DVDs will be available in a box set from Shout! Factory. (By Jennifer Swann | Indiewire)

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